Birth of a Painting Series VIII: Installation, "Water!".

Artist D.A. Hartley creates a series of empirical and experiential waterscapes in a video installation that explores the sights and sounds of water.
Water!: D.A. Hartley
Museumgoers might be expected to imagine entering a natural vista, experiencing the crashing of waves, the roar of a whitewater river, and the sounds of a brook working its way downward, in the cycle of movement, back to the ocean.
The viewers are invited to participate in a format of healing and reflection upon nature.
Water! A combination of large-scale videos within an installation format includes an inner meditation room, surrounded by paintings and the gentle sounds of water, designed to include the viewer in the artwork. The paintings are sculptural, created on large wood panels, with deep texture, oil paints, and gold leaf. The videos are of natural events; “Lost Canyon Falls”, includes water and fire, in a meditative film; “Lake Kaweah”, transforms two years of photos into a video time piece, recording the beauty of each passing day; “Douglas Creek”, includes streams, meadows, and the sounds of water. 
Lake Kaweah, 2007-2008, large-format video collection of stills.
Conley Gallery, CSU Fresno, 2008.  One Woman Show.
A video of stills, documenting the rising and
lowering of the waters of Lake Kaweah,
from the wild flowers of early spring,
to the snow-capped peaks in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California.
Paintings: 
"Cypress and Basalt", mixed media on wood, 4'x6', 2006. Private collection.                 

"Aspens", oil paint, gold leaf on wood, diptych, 6'x8', Private Collection.  

"Mountains, Clouds and Streams", mixed media on wood, triptych, 4'x6'. For Sale.    

"Silent Passage",oil paint on gessoed wood, 4'x6', 2004. Private Collection.                       
"Koi", oil paint, gold leaf on wood, diptych, 70"x 68", 2008. For Sale.

                                           


Copyright© Denise Hartley 2018
all rights reserved 

Birth of a Painting Series VII: "Douglas Creek".

         Douglas Creek is one of many small creeks that come directly from the high-country snowmelt and natural springs. It is our drinking water for our cabin in Stanislaus National Forest, located at 6,700 ft. where the water is delivered by gravity flow. After passing by our cabin it enters the South Fork of the Stanislaus River, which begins at (9,635 ft. (2,937 m) Leavitt Peak, in Tuolumne County and eventually enters the San Joaquin River, and drains into the San Francisco Bay.
          This little mountain stream and river have sustained life well beyond our time. There are parts of wagons used by the settlers trying to cross the Sierra Nevada Mountains. There are obsidian points from the Miwok Native American tribe and grinding stones. The tiny stream banks are lined with willow, horsetail herb, mints, orchids, and many other wildflowers. As a child I wandered where ever I wished, with the caveat that, if lost, head downhill. I have slept outdoors with bear and mountain lions as possible visitors. Deer have taken a nap beside me. Chipmunks and Golden Mantle squirrels have sat in my hands. I trust the four- legged critters but keep a wary eye on the two legged.

          Climate Change is changing our landscape quickly. We had to saw down six large beautiful Ponderosa trees this year alone. They are dying at a rapid rate, from bark beetles (love the heat), and a fungus, which spreads from fir tree roots. This was all predicted by a U.C. Berkeley scientist that wrote about how pollution affects the photosynthesis process, especially in the Ponderosa Pines. I watched a fire burn this summer across the river, tree torches burning brightly in the night. 

Denise Hartley

Birth of a Painting Series VI, "Nobe Young Falls".

Nature influences my art, every aspect of nature in the wild is so precious. In California we have been experiencing an extreme drought, which is causing fires, and tree disease and plant die out in our Sierra Nevada Mountains. We have lost thousands of trees in the last few years, and the loss of natural habitat is shocking.
My painting “Nobe Young Falls”, is a landscape created in oil paints. Nobe Young Falls are in Sequoia National Forest. I used to have a home in Camp Nelson, and the falls were near my home. It is an area that was homesteaded by my son’s great, great, grandmother, Nellie Marshall (the niece of John Marshall, discoverer of Gold! in California). She homesteaded 200 acres near Ponderosa, CA. in the Sierra Nevada’s of California, in 1870’s. She married Nathan Dillon, a gold rush businessman, and owner of land that is now Dillonwood Sequoia Grove in Sequoia National Park.
Nobe Young Falls are now a destination, when I hiked there it was an unmarked trail. If you would like to visit these falls there are now directions posted. https://www.world-of-waterfalls.com/california-nobe-young-falls.html
Here is a map of the Giant Sequoia Groves in the Sequoia National Forest. Camp Nelson, Ponderosa, and Dillonwood are located on the second map: Giant Sequoia Groves in Sequoia National Forest.

In this series, World of Abstraction, my paintings are based upon philosophical ideas, and addressing the unknown. Paintings by Denise...